Making It (Almost) Real With Decorative Shutter Hardware

Decorative Shutter HardwareIn modern homes, most outdoor shutters are not operational (that is, they don't open and close for real). Instead, thanks to the advent of glass windows, most of us have decorative shutters. What many people don't realize, however, is that one important aspect of decorative shutters is making them LOOK like they're operational. Sizing them properly so they look like they can actually cover the whole window when closed is very important. Of equal importance is shutter hardware, which makes the shutters look as if they can be opened and closed.

Let's take a look at the hardware that makes operational shutters functional (and that can be used on decorative shutters as well):

Shutter Hinges: Clearly, a shutter can't open and close without these. Operational hinges come in a lot of different styles, but a "Strap" hinge is generally the one you'll want to use with decorative shutters.

Shutter Stays (or "Dogs"): These keep your shutters from flapping around in the wind by holding them open and away from the window. "S" stays are most popular for decorative shutters, and can be placed either on the bottoms or sides.

Shutter Ring Pulls: Imagine you're standing inside your house and wanted to close the shutters from there. Ring pulls give you something to hold on to so you can close your shutters from indoors.

It's easiest to purchase a shutter hardware kit specially designed for use with decorative shutters. And I'd advise not overdoing it with the hardware (unless you're going for the fortress look) - a little hardware can go a long way to adding a realistic touch to your decorative shutters.